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PollyEster
February 3, 2006, 10:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


Posts: 552
Is this the future of haircare?

I found this article from 2001 and it made me consider what hairdressing will be like in the years to come ...

When the bedrock of our industry is the relationship between ourselves and the client - surely this method destroys one of the most important points of first contact between a client and their hairdresser .............


What do you think?

Designed in Japan, the Aqua Vibro mixes '50's styling with 21st century expertise. Using cutting edge technology, ten nozzles make pre-programmed, precision movements sending pulses of warm water that completely cleanse every hair right down to the root. Three further fixed nozzles send rhythmical pulses of water to massage the scalp from the temple to the crown.

The Aquavibro washes hair with pulses of warm water that cleanes the scalp and hair completely without scratching or jogging the head. Shampoo and conditioner are automatically applied evenly from the same nozzels and both the movement and timing are precisely controlled by computer.



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PollyEster
February 3, 2006, 10:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


Posts: 552
Compare that to this newspaper article from 2003

Where hairdressing forms an integral part of the social life in a small African village - a hub for people to gather, share stories, make friends and celebrate a way of life in it's most basic form. Hairdressing passed down from generation to generation, little need for technology and organic products grown from the land they farm themselves .....

I think i know which one i would choose ........

From herds to hairdressing
By Daniel Dickinson
BBC, Dar es Salaam

If you believe what you read in the guidebooks, then 27-year-old Maasai warrior Bonnie Lesimba should be deep in the African bush tending his cattle and fighting off - with his bare hands of course - the attention of marauding lions.

Maasai take pride in their new profession
But Bonnie is perhaps the new face of Maasai youth.

He still wears the traditional garb - robes, colourful beads and dinky white leather sandals, as well as carrying a ceremonial club.

However, he is one of a growing number of Maasai warriors who are rejecting the nomadic lifestyle in favour of more mainstream and lucrative jobs in the city.

Bonnie is engaged in what may at first sight seem a rather unwarrior-like activity.

He is a hairdresser, one who specialises in creating "rasta" hair styles, which involves weaving long strands of plaited hair into the cropped hair of his customers.

"It may seem a strange job for a Maasai," he said.


"But weaving hair is part of our culture. It's something we all learn from our parents."

Bonnie works at the Msusi Maasai hairdressing salon, one of three salons or 'saloons' as they are sometimes called, on a short block in the Ilala Boma district of Dar es Salaam.

Times change and we have to adapt to these changes  
Bonnie Lesimba
Maasai hairdresser

There are perhaps up to 30 Maasai warriors milling around waiting for clients.

Half a dozen or so of them hold an impromptu performance of a traditional Maasai song and dance, a type of tribal barbershop sextet, in an attempt perhaps to drum up some more business.

Already there are three young women who are having their hair turned into a rasta style.

Watching Bonnie and his team of three helpers at work is impressive.

His quick hands and skilful manipulation of hair is one reason why the Maasai hairdressers have become so popular.

Upendo Abbasi, who is one hour into the three hours it takes to finish the rasta style, has come from the other side of Dar es Salaam.

"The Maasai people are the best at doing this style," She said.

Cattle herders

"They are a lot quicker than other hairdressers and the hair remains in place for a lot longer. It's worth travelling for."

Seeing Bonnie Lesimba cooped up in the corrugated iron-roofed Msusi Mmasai salon, in deep concentration bent double over his customer, makes me wonder if he is really happy being a hairdresser.

Should he not be out in the bush under the wide expanse of the African sky wrestling lions as the guidebooks suggest?


Maasai go Rasta

"Times change and we have to adapt to these changes," he told me.

"Of course, traditionally we were nomadic cattle herders, but as our herds became smaller, there was less work on the land.

"So we had to find new sources of income. That's why many of us moved to the city."

Maasai people, whose ancestral homeland straddles the border between Kenya and Tanzania, are now a fairly common sight in Dar es Salaam and other Tanzanian cities.

Hairdressing is not the first new line of work they have tried.

Many Maasai, whose reputation for bravery, rightly or wrongly precedes them, have worked as security guards or night watchmen at hotels and private houses, but according to Bonnie it is boring and badly paid work.

"As a security guard you can earn just $50 a month, but hairdressing which is more interesting pays a lot better," he explained.

Lucrative business

Bonnie's customers pay anything from $15 to $40 for the rasta style, a considerable investment considering the average wage in Tanzania is just over $1 a day.

Although he has to pay his helpers and rent for the salon, he makes good money.

For now, rasta is the single most fashionable style among the men and women of Tanzania.

More Maasai warriors are laying down their spears and moving to the city to take part in this lucrative business.

As long as rasta remains popular then the Maasai are likely to continue weaving their way into profit.
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jewel4hair4
February 4, 2006, 8:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Excellent polly
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jewel4hair4
February 25, 2006, 5:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I was thinking the aqua vibro would probably get rid of migraines all the lovely water moveing on the head
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admin
February 25, 2006, 6:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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sounds cosy, still the personal touch has a lot to be said for it


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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jewel4hair4
February 25, 2006, 10:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes too right admin
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jewel4hair4
February 25, 2006, 10:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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yes you are right and the professional touch too
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