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PollyEster
January 16, 2006, 7:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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This is an article from the Times - as if we didn't already know!!!!!  lol

The Sunday Times     January 01, 2006

We’ll sort out the world, sweetie ...
John Elliott and Claire Newell
Hairdressers should rule, says think tank

WELCOME to the political salon of the future: the hairdressing salon. A leading think tank is suggesting hairdressers should be drafted in to help shape local government policy because they are at the cutting edge of their communities.
Specially trained crimpers could also dispense advice to clients on how to make the most of public services such as hospitals, schools and local councils, claim researchers at Demos, which has close links to Labour.

Though it might sound improbable, some observers believe the proposal could offer a cheaper, more effective alternative to the armies of outreach co-ordinators and community workers currently paid for by the taxpayer.

Nicky Clarke, the Mayfair-based stylist who counts George Michael, Jemima Khan, Elizabeth Hurley and the Duchess of York among his clients, said: “It does sound odd but thinking about it, hairdressers probably do have their finger on the pulse more than any other profession.”

“Our research has led us to conclude that hairdressers are the most authentic voice on the high street,” said the Demos document, “and they should be given a formal role in urban policy making.

“Politicians should use the 99,000 hairdressers in the UK to assist in decision making relating to urban policy, town centre regeneration and the delivery of local services.”

Researchers reached their conclusions while working on Glasgow 2020, a year-long project supported by Glasgow city council and the Scottish executive, which is intended to discover what the city will be like in 2020.

Alongside meetings of council chiefs, policemen, asylum seekers and students, Demos is holding a series of events to canvass the opinions of hairdressers and has organised a “stylists’ summit” this month in Glasgow.

A Demos spokesman said that hairdressers were identified as having “high social engagement” and privy to a uniquely high number of intimate and lengthy conversations through their work, which made them an ideal link between policy makers and the public.

Gerry Hassan, co-leader of the Demos project, said: “There’s an intimacy that goes on in conversations with hairdressers . . . People talk to them about their jobs, their family and their relationships.”

He claimed hairdressers are especially sensitive to the “feel” of a city. “Whether to send their children to private schools, whether their husband is having an affair, all the moral issues under the sun are covered under the dryer,” he said.

Ray Seymour, general secretary of the National Hairdresser’s Federation, said: “Most hairdressers have been to the university of life and are intuitive at dealing with people.”

Asked to pick subjects hairdressers would be good at advising public officials about, Seymour said: “Family issues, from things like problems with children and lack of youth facilities, to an outbreak of head lice.

“And some social issues — I’ve heard our members talk about young women trying to jump the council housing list by getting pregnant.”

Errol Douglas, a London stylist, said he had detected strong opposition among his clients to the abolition of the capital’s Routemaster buses.

Michael Cimino, artistic director of Michaeljohn, a hair and beauty company, said the Demos proposals did not go far enough. He suggested a “hairdressers’ ambassador” with the power to go above councils’ heads and tip-off Whitehall about the latest developments in public opinion.
However. Ann Widdecombe, the Tory MP who famously re-invented herself as a blonde, said: “It all sounds daft to me, but there’s an over-obsession with trying to find Mr Average when there’s no such thing.”

Many hairdressers share Widdecombe’s concerns and are cautious about the prospect of advising the public. They emphasised the need for proper training or having a limited role, such as handing out helpline numbers.

In America, government programmes have trained hairdressers to spot signs of domestic abuse in clients and refer them to the police or advice lines.

Liz Crockett, a spokesman for a scheme in Syracuse, New York state, said: “In barber shops we’re distributing information about prostate cancer screening and information about breast cancer screening in beauty parlours.”

However, should hairdressers be called in to bail out local officials, as Demos suggests, none is likely to match the influence wielded by Paul Allen, coiffeur to Baroness Thatcher.

He confessed he once complained to her about the trendy teaching his daughters were receiving at a state school.

Lord Baker, the former education secretary, conceded Allen was influential. “On the curriculum (Thatcher) did have views, which as far as I could see came from her hairdresser,” he said.




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admin
January 16, 2006, 8:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Very good article, well done, I think hairdressing is totally people orientated, with good people skills you can go a long way, and following this article I think we should set up a topic where hairdressers can voice these opinions,


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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PollyEster
January 17, 2006, 7:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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PollyEster
January 17, 2006, 7:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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Event: Chatter Group: Hairdressers

DLC Hair Salon, Mitchell Lane on Monday, 23rd January 2006


Few people have the opportunity to meet as many strangers in a day as hairdressers. For many of us, telling and  exchanging stories is all part of having a hair cut. Maybe this explains why hairdressers are all apparently so happy. In anycase, it figures that this regular contact with strangers can give hairdressers a rich and interesting perspective on Glasgow and its future. Furthermore, in the Tescos era, where better to go than the hairdresser to find one of the last authentic voices of the highstreet (82% of hair salons are independently run)?

In the evening of 23rd January 2006, there will be a story telling workshop and discussion about Glasgow and its future with the city's hairdressers. The event will be attended by authors, who will work with the participants to develop different stories about the lives of people in 2020. If you cut hair professionally and you're interested in coming along, send an e-mail to jenny.hammil@glasgow2020.co.uk.



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PollyEster
January 17, 2006, 7:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


Posts: 552
Article from Irish Sunday Times


After the recent Demos think tank report on the political importance of hairdressers, Susan Hall from the Enhance salon in Harrow calls to say she’s on the official Tory candidates list and aims to be the first hairdresser in the Commons. She should be offered a safe seat immediately. Imagine what fun prime minister’s questions would be. “Would the prime minister reveal if he’s been anywhere nice on his holidays lately? And would he like me to do something about those grey bits?”
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admin
January 17, 2006, 8:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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All very interesting


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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admin
January 17, 2006, 8:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Poly for priminister ?


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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PollyEster
January 17, 2006, 8:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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Quote from Yes! Prime Minister

Humphrey (about Hacker): He's got no. 10, a salary, a pension for life. What more can he want?

Bernard: I think he wants to govern Britain.

Humphrey: Well stop him, Bernard!

(The Ministerial Broadcast)
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jewel4hair4
January 22, 2006, 8:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Well done again polly excellent articles
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jewel4hair4
January 22, 2006, 8:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I vote polly for prime minister too
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PollyEster
January 23, 2006, 8:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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Oh Yeh - no sleaze for them 2 dredge up on me - hmmmmmmmmmm

HEADLINES -

'POLLY PUTS HAIRDRESSERS IN TOP INCOME BRACKET'

'OFFICIAL HAIRDRESSING DAY OF WORSHIP'

'PRIME MINISTER BANS ALL OFF-THE-SHELF PRODUCTS'

'SHORTER WORKING HOURS FOR HAIRDRESSERS TO PARTY'

'IT'S OFFICIAL - THE MULLET IS BANNED'



Hmmmmmmmm - think my manifesto needs some slight attention
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admin
January 23, 2006, 8:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Call it St Fluffy, scissors will be history on this day, I campaigning for a hairdressers bank holiday


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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PollyEster
January 23, 2006, 8:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


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... and a nice trip 2 the sea-side with our buckets and spades and lashings of ginger beer.

Better make it Cornwall - I hear the pier is a little 'charred!'
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admin
January 23, 2006, 8:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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And Cornwall famous for its pasties and its pasties


Fluffython - the largest group portrait of hairdressers
http://www.fluffython.org.uk
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PollyEster
January 23, 2006, 8:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator


Posts: 552
WHO'S CORNISH???????!!!!!!!!!

Not me!!!

Just think how many novels and poems and artists this landscape has inspired- more than the amount of own goals the Shrimpers score i bet........

ooh i think that may have touched a footie nerve

* Polly waits for the torrent of Gunners jokes








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